London Film Festival: Walking with Shadows, Two of Us & Rehearsal

And we’re off, London Film Festival opens on October 2nd and I’ve been lucky enough to have early access to a selection of films. Here are three reviews, starting with a short film.

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Film Festival Review: Little Wing 2019

Image result for throuple chrissie de guzmanHello all! I’m back writing about film, as ‘tis the season, right? London Film Festival is about to start (I’ve already started watching some gems – see future articles) and last week-end I went to a film festival that is dear to my heart, Little Wing Film Festival. It’s in its third year and celebrates first-time filmmakers as well as students and graduates. 

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2018: film review (old and new)

This year the list is pretty short. I took a lot in, but I think my highlights say something about the changes happening in cinema right now. Old giants are falling, new giants are rising. I also list two works from the past which I discovered in the last twelve months.  

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The Guilty (Den skyldige, 2018)

The GuiltyThis was one of the rare times when someone took me to a film I knew nothing about. Actually, that’s not entirely true. I did know from the poster that it was a thriller, and was afraid I was going to go through a gory Danish crime thriller that would be difficult to get over. In the end, the film was not gory, but possibly one of the best thrillers I’ve ever seen, shot entirely in a police station and with the camera focused on one single character. Continue reading

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The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat Ağacı, 2018)

WildPearTree1It’s been three weeks already since I saw Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s latest film and I have been itching to write my thoughts on it.

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Clara: One-woman show

Clara_ElenaMazzonWhen hearing the name Schumann, many will first think of Robert. But what about the other Schumann whose music can transport us just as much? In Clara, we get to know the woman who tried to pursue her prolific music career after marrying Robert Schumann and despite getting increasingly lost behind her husband’s shadow – and name.

Elena Mazzon presents her one-woman show which has just premiered in London at From the Forest Festival. In the play, she plays Clara Schumann (1819-1896) who is preparing for a date with Johannes Brahms while sharing her memories about what led her to this date in the first place.

She married Robert right before her 21st birthday against her father’s will, who would have preferred her to become an independent musician. This relationship between father and daughter is described movingly by Mazzon, certainly touching soft spots of many in the audience. In addition, one can’t help but note the importance of putting a woman in the spotlight who had to fight to be respected by the many men in her field, starting with her husband who gave her ultimatums and worried about being overshadowed by his wife’s talent.

Directed by Catriona Kerridge, Mazzon supports her speech with piano music, composed either by Clara herself, Robert or Brahms. It is amusing to notice how when she leans on her piano, Clara feels secure. However, as soon as she walks away from her piano, she starts panicking, losing some her control. Music was everything for Clara, and always in first place, even in front of her many children.

This is a show that I hope will tour the world, giving a new voice to this maestro who herself visited and graced many cities with her music in the Romantic era. I also hope that with time it will contain even more played piano, as it adds such a beautiful element to the play. Stay tuned by following https://www.elenamazzon.com/clara-a-show-for-an-actress-and-a-piano/

 

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Tully (2018)

Mom, what’s wrong with your body?

Tully filmThis month, I discovered what dry brushing is. Don’t you find that sometimes you read about something, and soon enough, it enters your life in some other way too? The film Tully by Jason Reitman, the acclaimed director of Juno, Up in the Air and Young Adult, opens with Marlo (Charlize Theron) brushing her son Jonah’s body (Asher Miles Fallica). She does this every night before bed time, as it helps him release anxiety.

When we meet her, Marlo is nine months pregnant, about to give birth any day. She has two children and lives with her husband Drew (Ron Livingston), who has a complicated auditing job, in upstate New York. One could confidently say that Marlo’s home life and life situation in general are a cause for depression: she can’t be bothered to cook for her children and heats up frozen food for them every day, she watches a pornographic reality show called “Gigolo” every night and can’t seem to find joy in anything. One evening, her brother Craig (Mark Duplass) recommends she hire a night nanny to prevent her from collapsing after the new baby comes. While she is cynical about a stranger taking care of her baby at first, after one of Jonah’s many tantrums, she takes the plunge and calls the nanny called Tully (Mackenzie Davis).

Tully becomes the guardian angel that Marlo needed, cleaning the house and most importantly taking care of newly born Mia. As the nights progress, Marlo catches up on her much-missed sleep, starts enjoying her new daughter’s presence and reconnects with her family and community. Furthermore, she bonds with Tully and finds a new friend in this carefree, charming and spontaneous person.

However, this spontaneity will prove dangerous on the night Tully pushes Marlo to leave her house and party in New York City.

I will not give too much away here, but writer Diablo Cody and director Reitman show us a unique view of motherhood and honour the difficulties mothers face without admitting to them. Like in many of his previous films, Reitman observes what happens behind closed doors, honouring family and respecting those who lurk in the shadows. Tully ultimately represents a nostalgia for Marlo’s carefree past, but is also a reminder of what she’s achieved and how proud she can be of that.

Charlize Theron excels as a principled yet messy woman who has been burying her feelings for too long. Her motherhood of three children has ripped her of her sleep and of any desires outside of it. A lethargic quality overwhelms the actress’s whole body which means she just needs to fully be in that state to form her character. It’s wonderful to watch Theron with Duplass. Brother-sister relationships on screen are special, and here, few words create an entire backstory for the two of them.

Livingston is a strong supporting character as Marlo’s husband, realising quite late how much he’s been taking her for granted. Finally, Davis is an intriguing, slightly alien-like presence who keeps surprising us but also quickly smells of danger.

I highly recommend this film for the twists in the story and the delightful central performances.

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